fbook icon 60Quiz Kid?

Childhood pic 1 

I was a nerdy kid who loved accumulating facts. My Year 5 teacher, Mr Graham, a quiz champion on 'Pick A Box', was my idol.  He knew everything about everything and I wanted to be just like him.

When I was ten or eleven, I persuaded my mother to take me to an audition for the ‘Quiz Kids’, a weekly TV show on the ABC, hosted by John Dease. It was school holidays and I recall going to a hall in Newtown, receiving a name tag and being directed to a seat in a row towards the back, while my mum joined the other parents on benches at the side of the room. Then Mr Dease appeared, a kindly and affable quizmaster with an upper-class English accent. He explained that he would ask each of us a different question in seating order and repeat the procedure over the course of several rounds. Forty bright-eyed children hung on his every word.

Like almost everyone else, I was able to give a correct answer in the first round. But the questions proved to be more difficult second time around, and all too quickly it was my turn again. In his mellifluous voice, Mr Dease asked me:

What is the origin of the word ‘nickname’?

I had absolutely no idea. While I racked my brain, the quizmaster smiled encouragingly. All at once, the answer struck me like a proverbial lightning bolt. With supreme confidence I responded:

‘A nickname is the name that replaces your real name when someone nicks it.’

There were giggles from the other children. Soon it had grown into waves of laughter. Even the parents were chuckling.

Mr Dease responded gently, ‘What an amusing answer, Deborah. We need children with a sense of humour.’

But it wasn’t meant to be funny, I thought to myself, aware that a hot blush was staining my face a bright shade of pink.

Mr Dease must have noticed my discomfort because he added, ‘That was a good attempt.' Then he proceeded to give the correct answer - a nickname is an additional name and comes from the Old English word 'eke', meaning 'addition', which was subsequently mispronounced as 'neke'. Hence 'nekename'.

The quizmaster’s kindness couldn’t soothe my embarrassment. I sank down in the chair and when my turn came to answer again, my mind went blank. It was an easy enough question: ‘What is a depot?’ (Mr Dease pronounced it ‘deeep-oh’) but I couldn’t think straight, and that was the pattern for the rest of the audition. At the end of the afternoon, a select group of students was chosen to join the team. Naturally, I wasn’t among them.

And so my career as a TV ‘Quiz Kid’ was over before it began. Actually, it was much like what happens to my fictional accountant Kevin Dwyer in 'The Trivia Man'* when he auditions for an ’80s program called ‘The World’s Biggest Quiz’. Except that Kevin is asked to name the oldest form of mammal and he gives the correct answer. But a very stern quizmaster called Frank Fortune, who has a completely different answer on his card, tells Kevin he's wrong.

That day I went home and sought out the 'Concise Oxford Dictionary' – yes, the one I’d purchased by saving several months’ worth of pocket money. My trusty dictionary confirmed everything that Mr Dease had said. I leafed to the back where there were blank pages for notes. Taking a pencil I wrote the origin of the word ‘nickname’ in my neatest writing. The annotation remains there to this day.

I’ve never told anyone this story before, not even my closest friends.  

Over the years they've suggested I audition for various TV quiz shows, but I’ve always demurred. Now they know why! 

Dictionary* 'The Trivia Man' will be released 1 June 2015.

If you enjoyed this article, you might also like Trivia Isn't Trivial and The Trivia Man Is Coming.

Deborah O’Brien

1 February, 2015


fbook icon 60 BLOG ARTICLES BY DATE

Home in the Highlands: A Tale of Two Chandeliers  April 2018

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/blog/12-blog/233-home-in-the-highlands-a-tale-of-two-chandeliers


Home in the Highlands: The Secret Garden  April 2018

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/232-home-in-the-highlands-the-secret-garden

 

Home in the Highlands: Finding the Dream Home  March 2018

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/231-home-in-the-highlands-blog


Book Review: 'Lake Hill' by Margareta Osborn   June 2017

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/230-book-review-lake-hill-by-margareta-osborn


Film Review: 'Their Finest'  April 2017

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/229-film-review-their-finest


Film Review: 'Alone in Berlin   March 2017

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/228-film-review-alone-in-berlin

 

My Top Six Tips for Writing Historical Fiction   Feb 2017

http://www.deborahobrien.com.au/index.php/12-blog/227-my-top-six-tips-for-aspiring-writers-of-historical-fiction

 

'The Princess Diarist', Carrie Fisher Carrie Fisher small


 

'The Rarest Thing' Playlist   Nov 2016Grey possum


 

Book Review: 'Daintree' by Annie Seaton   Nov 2016Annie Seaton 500


 

 Interview with Annie Seaton   Nov 2016Annie Seaton 500


 

Crafting Characters   Oct 2016Grey possum

 


Welcome to 'The Rarest Thing' Blog Tour    Oct 2016Web Cover3 July11 420


 

TV Review: Reality Big Guns  Aug 2016Australian Survivor season 3 logo


 

Five Things I Love about Writing Fiction  Aug 2016Kinokinuya cropped


 

Deborah's Yummy Chocolate Mousse   July 2016Chocolate mousse 4



A Gallipoli Story: Finding Uncle Arthur   April 2016Graphic map of the Dardanelles



A World Without Downton: The 'Downton Abbey' Finale  April 16Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 


What is 'The Rarest Thing'?   April 2016
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Film Review: 'Brooklyn'   Feb 2016Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231



Molly Grows Up   Feb 2016Border collie puppy cropped


    

Film Review: 'The Revenant'   Jan 2016Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 


Book Review: 'Kakadu Sunset' by Annie Seaton Jan 16Annie Seaton 500

 


Q&A with Annie Seaton   Jan 2016Annie Seaton 500



Meet Mrs Christmas   Dec 2015Christmas ornaments



Film Review: 'The Dressmaker'   Dec 2015Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231



'The Trivia Man' Trivia Quiz  Nov 2015Make a date with the Trivia Man


 

 The Nerd as Hero: Reclaiming the Label   July 2015Meet The Trivia Man 420
(Guest Blog for Dark Matter Zine at their website)


 

Writing and Art   July 2015Concept sketch MCE DOBrien
Guest Blog for Australian Rural Romance

 

 

Another Bookish Trivia Quiz   July 2015Make date TTM


 

A Bookish Trivia Quiz   June 2015Kirsty People 420

 

 

The Trivia Man Blog Tour   June 2015Kirsty People 420

 


Launching 'The Trivia Man'  June 2015Kirsty People 420

 

 

A Gallipoli Story: The Lost Shearer   April 2015JNorris Scrapbook 33



'The Trivia Man' Competition Winners   April 2015Kirsty People 420

 

 

Meet the Cast of 'The Trivia Man'   April 2015Kirsty People 420


 

What Makes a Good Tagline?   March 2015TTM People



Quiz Kid?    Feb 2015Dictionary


 

Film Review: 'Birdman'  Jan 2015Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231


 

Film Review: 'The Water Diviner'   Jan 2015Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 


The Trivia Man Is Coming  Dec 2014TTM People


 

My Christmas Dec 2014Christmas Heart

 


Zucchini and Herb Frittata  Nov 2014Frittata baked



Trivia Isn't Trivial  Nov 2014Trivia Girl cropped

 

Lost and Found    Oct 2014Twins



Winners of the Spring Giveaway  Oct 2014deb castle



Spring Giveaway   Sept 2014deb castle


 

Film Review: 'Magic in the Moonlight'  Sept 2014Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231



The Cutting Room Floor  Sept 2014DOB SS 31



Film Review: 'The 100-Foot Journey'  Aug 2014Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 


Rose Scott Women Writers' Festival  Aug 2014DOB Styled 2

 


Film Review: 'Jersey Boys'   July 2014Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231



Winners of Winter Giveaway   July 2014Trilogy books



Emporium Trilogy Quiz  (with answers)   June 2014Slide12



Film Review: 'The Fault in Our Stars'   June 2014Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 

 

An Aspiring Author's Guide to Book Jargon   June 2014DOB Styled 2



The Beatles and Me   June 2014Beatles 1


 

Book Giveaway Winners   May 2014APOHO and vase 450


 

Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

Film Review: 'The Grand Budapest Hotel'  May 2014


  

Launching 'A Place of Her Own'  May 2014600 Cropped cover knees


 

Free Bookmarks to Download   March 2014DSCF1598 cropped


 

Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

Film Review: 'The Monuments Men'  March 2014


 

Film Review: 'Twelve Years a Slave'  Feb 2014Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

 


My Top Ten Romantic Comedies   Feb 2014

 

 

Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231

Film Review: 'Saving Mr. Banks'    Feb 2014



Four Stories about Platonic Love   Feb 2014JNorris Scrapbook 21

 

 

Five Books about Unrequited Love  Jan 2014DOB Alice 05

 

 

First Impressions  Jan 2014PG Spring13 10

 

 

Christmas at My Place  Dec 2013Christmas flowers

 

 

About a Dog   November 2013Angel20131119 2

 

 

What's Next? 'A Place of Her Own'  Nov 2013PG Spring13 10


 

The Amazing Mr Carroll  November 2013DOB Alice 05


 

Film Review: 'About Time'  October 2013Admit one movie ticket isolated on white Stock Photo - 9269231



The Jade Widow@Mr Chen's Emporium  Oct 2013MCE Model 5

 


Ode to Spring   September 2013PG Spring13 02



When a Platypus's Fancy Turns to Love   Sept 2013PG Spring13 01



How Big Is Your Book?   September 2013DOB Styled 1



 

Fairytale Turrets and Other Fantasies  August 2013 

A Winter's Tale  August 2013

'He Who Would Valiant Be'  August 2013

Country Dog  July 2013

Spot the Anachronism!  July 2013

Puppy Proof?  July 2013 

A World Without Books: 'Fahrenheit 451'  June 2013

A Bonzer Aussie Dog  June 2013

Review: Hope's Road  June 2013

Puppy Love  May 2013

Attack of the Anachronisms  May 2013

When Winter Comes Early  May 2013

The Victorian Art of Scrapbooking  April 2013

In Search of the Emporium  April 2013

Elegant Architecture  April 2013

A Country Sunday  March 2013

Adverbs and Chocolate  Feb 2013

Introducing THE JADE WIDOW  Jan 2013

The Colour Lilac  Jan 2013

2012

Christmas  Dec 2012

Alpacas versus Llamas  Dec 2012

The Jade Widow  Nov 2012

Angie's Westerns  Nov 2012

Recreational Sewing in Cesarine  Oct 2012 

Inspirations for 'Mr Chen's Emporium'  Sept 2012 

An Aladdin's Cave   Sept 2012 

Anatomy of a Gold Rush Town  Sept 2012  

Amy Duncan and her Books  Sept 2012

Old-fashioned Heroes  Sept 2012

Happy Endings?  Sept 2012

Why Is a Book Like a TARDIS?  Sept 2012

An Emporium by Any Other Name  Aug 2012 

Never Write When You're Hungry  July 2012

The Case of the Missing Monotremes  June 2012

The World of the Book  May, 2012

Frosty Tales  April 2012

Tales of the Emporium  March 2012

Country Ways  Feb 2012

Life with a Platypus  Feb 2012


 

 






fbook icon 60Film Review: ‘Birdman’

Birdman poster.jpg 

‘Birdman’ is an exhausting film - a helter-skelter journey inside a Broadway production in the lead-up to opening night. Director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has cleverly constructed his movie to seem like one continuous take. We literally follow the characters through the bowels of a New York theatre, onto the stage, and out the doors into West 44th Street where ‘Phantom of the Opera’ is playing just across the road. The director doesn’t allow us a chance to catch our breath, and before we know it, we’re enmeshed in the dysfunctional yet intriguing lives of the characters.

I’ve never been a Michael Keaton fan but his performance in ‘Birdman’ totally won me over. He’s amazing as Riggan Thomson, a film actor who became famous playing a super-hero called ‘Birdman’ (shades of Keaton’s own fame as Tim Burton’s Batman). Now Thomson is trying to prove that he’s much more than a has-been celebrity. So he’s adapted a Raymond Carver story for the stage. He’s also directing the play and taking the lead role. With all that on his plate, plus a difficult cast and a daughter (Emma Stone) who’s a recovering drug addict, it’s not surprising that Thomson appears to be on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Among other things, he hallucinates that he can move objects by telekinesis (or maybe he can really do it). And inside his head he can hear the voice of his alter ego (or nemesis), Birdman, egging him on.

One of my favourite actors, Edward Norton is reunited with Naomi Watts, his leading lady from ‘The Painted Veil’, but the parts they play in ‘Birdman’ are as removed from their romantic characters in the Somerset Maugham story as they could possibly be. Norton is mesmerising (and incredibly funny) as Mike Shiner, an über-talented and egotistical actor who wants everything his own way, even to the extent of rewriting the dialogue – his and everyone else’s. Naomi Watts is an insecure actress making her Broadway debut and trying to escape Mike’s libidinous attentions.

Be prepared for an abundance of in-jokes, name-dropping and theatre talk. Director Inarritu has a dig at Method actors in the guise of Edward Norton’s character, and at critics in two scenes involving an influential reviewer played impeccably by another of my favourites, British actress Lindsay Duncan.

In May 2014, when I reviewed ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’, I made a rather rash, long-range forecast that it would win the Oscar for Best Picture*. Now I’m not so sure. Both films are clever, funny and innovative, yet each pays its dues to Hollywood traditions in its own unique way. In ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ it’s the 1930s movies of Lubitsch and Co, set in a mythical Middle Europe; in ‘Birdman’, it’s the dark super-heroes of recent decades.

If either of these outstanding films wins the golden figurine, I’ll be happy, but if I had to make a choice between them, it would be the decorative and stylish confection with a dark centre – ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’.

A warning: There are some graphic scenes in ‘Birdman’ and equally graphic language.

* This week 'The Grand Budapest Hotel' won a Golden Globe Award for Best Picture - Comedy or Musical.

Deborah O’Brien

23 January, 2015


 

fbook icon 60Film Review:

‘The Water Diviner’

 

I have to confess that I came to ‘The Water Diviner’ with a personal agenda. My great-uncle Arthur was one of 8709 Australian soldiers who died at Gallipoli and I feared that this picture might trivialise something which has always been sacred to me. Fortunately I was wrong. In his directorial debut Russell Crowe has crafted a very fine film about a father’s search for his three sons, missing in action on the Gallipoli Peninsula.

Like the three young men in ‘The Water Diviner’, my great-uncle was a country boy caught up in the colonial fervour to serve King and Empire. For them, it was a ‘great adventure’, and although fathers like Joshua Connor and my own great grandfather James Hill would later agonise over having allowed their boys to enlist, the pervading atmosphere at that time was one of flag-waving and glory, and few foresaw the carnage to come. The fictional Connor brothers joined the 7th Battalion AIF recruited from Victoria; my great-uncle the 2nd Infantry Battalion from NSW. The Connor boys went missing in action on 7 August 2015. My uncle Arthur was killed exactly two months earlier. The eldest Connor son, played by the very talented Ryan Corr, shares my great-uncle’s name.

The story begins in December 1915 just after Australian troops have been evacuated without a single casualty – the antithesis of the horrific landing and the bloody campaign itself. The first soldiers we meet are Turkish, under the command of Major Hasan (Yilmaz Erdoğan). They have just discovered that they’ve been tricked by self-firing rifles left in the Australian trenches. We are shown the impact of the campaign from the perspective of these men defending their homeland. In this respect, it is a departure from earlier films such as Peter Weir’s 'Gallipoli'.

Rifle

Self-firing rifle, The Army Museum, Bandiana. Pic courtesy of WGH.

There are many excellent performances in ‘The Water Diviner’ but Russell Crowe is its towering strength. He is the river gum, its roots buried deep within the Australian soil, its trunk solid and sturdy. We see the aching pain he feels for his lost family and the goodness in his heart. Not once do we question his decision to travel to a faraway land in search of his sons or doubt his commitment to bring them home to be buried beside their mother.

My own great grandfather never saw his son’s grave, except in a photograph sent by the army with details of its location in the Lone Pine Cemetery at ANZAC Cove. James Hill received a brown parcel containing a small wallet, a metal disc and a letter – these were Arthur’s only remaining possessions from his six weeks in the Dardanelles. My great grandfather duly signed the acknowledgment form and returned it to the military authorities. Medals followed, but nothing could replace his lost son, the six-foot shearer with grey eyes, olive complexion and dark brown hair.

There are many threads in Crowe’s richly crafted film, all woven together with expert skill – the tale of the magic carpet from the 'Arabian Nights' juxtaposed with Australian icons such as the steel windmill and the cricket bat. Each motif plays its role within the story as both metaphor and practical part of the plot.

Cinematographer Andrew Lesnie gives us images that linger long after the film is over: the dust storms of western Victoria, Istanbul’s magical skyline with its mosques and minarets, the killing fields of Gallipoli. Writers Andrew Knight (of ‘Sea Change’ fame) and Andrew Anastasio have created an engrossing story, an historically accurate framework and a screenplay graced with authentic dialogue. On the latter count, Julian Fellowes, please take note.

In a nutshell, ‘The Water Diviner’ is a moving homage to the Australian and Turkish soldiers who fought at Gallipoli and a hymn to the tragic futility of war. I commend it to you without reservation.


If you would like to read more about Australia's involvement in earlier imperial wars, see my article, He Who Would Valiant Be.

Deborah O’Brien

5 January, 2015


fbook icon 60The Trivia Man Is Coming

 Kevin Portrait

When you’ve been working on a manuscript for several years and you finally submit the finished product to your publisher, it’s incredibly nerve-racking. A couple of weeks pass without a word, and by then you’ve convinced yourself that they hate your whimsical, offbeat story but are too polite to tell you so.

Then an email pings into your inbox from the publisher entitled ‘The Trivia Man’. It takes a while to summon the courage to open it. You come up with a series of delaying tactics – a cup of tea, a Tim Tam (or two), a ball game with the dog, another cup of tea – but eventually you have to return to your laptop and face the inevitable. You click on the email and start to read. Here is what it says:

‘I loved it. Such beautiful characters and a heart-warming story . . . an enchanting book’.

‘The Trivia Man’ is very special to me for many reasons, but I can’t go into them without giving away the plot. Suffice it to say that the book explores a range of issues – from the dangers of stereotyping people to the need we all have to find a place to belong.

As for genre, the book is hard to classify. There’s romance in the story but it’s not romantic fiction. There’s humour but it’s not a comedy. There’s a good amount of nostalgia but the setting is contemporary rather than historical. In a nutshell, ‘The Trivia Man’ is funny, sweet, sad and quirky. I hope you'll like it. And I'll let you into a secret -  it's my favourite of all the books I've written.

*‘The Trivia Man’ will be released by Random House Books Australia on 1 June  2015.


P.S. For my personal connection with all things related to trivia, see: 'Trivia Isn't Trivial'.

Trivia Girl cropped

Text and illustrations: Deborah O'Brien

6 December, 2014